BURGER KING LORD OF THE RINGS

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In 1989, Burger King (BK) re-launched its children's meal program as the Burger King Kids Club meal in the US and in New Zealand. The Burger King Kids Club Gang, a multi-ethnic group of fictional characters, were created to promote the BK Kids Club meal by providing a group of stylized characters. In their birthday month, BK Kids Club members receive an annual mailing that contains games, product information, and a coupon for a free Kids Meal. Although the BK Kids Club Gang promotion has been discontinued in the US, the club continues to operate and is the largest club of its kind in North America. The characters can still be seen on playground signs and decorations in some locations.

In 2001 BK launched their promotion for The Fellowship of the Ring, "US market" with 19 toys that had sound or light features. When all were collected and assembled they formed a circle of characters around "The One Ring of Power". 

BK would also release a set of Light-up glasses for the promotion.

An earlier BK promotional concept was also pitched, which would have seen the release of smaller plastic "Army Men" version of Lord of the Rings characters. This concept art can be found in the unproduced toys section.

For the international market a different selection of toys was made available. Germany had a nine character selection (Legolas, Frodo, Arwen, Gimli, Saruman, Gandalf, Aragorn, Galadriel, and a Ringwraith), each of which came in plastic boxes shaped like books. Each box also included 1 film cell. There were at least 3 different film cells to collect per character. Making it a total of 27 movie cells.

BK also teamed up with Toy Biz running a mail in promotion for an exclusive Toy Biz Uruk-Hai figure. This was limited to 5000 units world-wide. It required 3 or 4 Proof of Purchase (POPs) and receipts to be mailed in to receive a figure. During this promotion the company ran out of Uruk-Hai, and substituted a Lurtz figure in the same plain white box. The Burger King Uruk-Hai is considered the rarest production figure of the Toy Biz Lord of the Rings line.

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Lord of the Rings Toy Archive